Sociolinguistics

Jargon and its Types with examples in detail

Jargon

Jargon is a particular and familiar language used by members of a certain social group. This kind of dialect can be difficult to understand for those who are not part of the aforementioned community. Jargon is usually born to hide the meaning of words. This is the case, for example, of prison jargon , used by prisoners to prevent their preservation from being captured by the authorities. This reason leads to the terms used in jargon being temporary : once they are adopted and their use becomes widespread, they cease to be used. Jargon and its Types with examples in detail

There are jargon that arise due to geographical issues and that, over time, can become part of a regional dialect. There is no intention, in this case, to hide the meaning of words, but rather they arise from the sense of belonging and the intention to differentiate themselves from other groups .

Slang is a special language of a differentiated social group that is only used by the speakers of that social group. This particular language may be difficult for those who are not part of that particular social group to understand.

This kind of “dialect” is born by the need of social groups to hide the meaning of certain words. In prison jargon, for example, prisoners use a specific language that only they understand and that prevents security guards from knowing what they are talking about. But in jargon there is an inconvenience, which is usually mostly temporary words . Once they are extended, they cease to be useful for the social group and cease to be used.

There are also several types of jargon and levels . The jargon will not be the same in a family environment than the jargon used in the most disadvantaged groups. In addition, there are jargon that arise due to geographical issues and, over time, are part of the regional dialect itself. This will depend a lot on the extension of the word and the acceptance by the whole group of speakers of that particular dialect.

Where does the word jargon come from?

The slang word comes from French. The origin derives from “gargon”, which was the language used by thieves. Before that, there was the word gargun , which referred to the chirping of birds. Gargun , in turn, derives from the Latin gurgesgurgitis with a meaning of abyss or whirlwind .

Slang

Slang is a special language of a differentiated social group that is only used by the speakers of that social group themselves. This particular language can be difficult to understand for those people who are not part of that particular social group.

This kind of “dialect” is born by the need of social groups to hide the meaning of certain words. In prison jargon, for example, prisoners use a certain language that only they understand and that prevents security guards from knowing what they are talking about. But in jargon there is a drawback, which are usually temporary words for the most part. Once they are extended, they are no longer useful to the social group and they are no longer used.

Also, there are several types of jargon and levels . The jargon in a family environment will not be the same as the jargon used in the most disadvantaged groups. In addition, there are also jargons that arise due to geographical reasons and that, over time, become part of the regional dialect itself. This will depend a lot on the length of the word and the acceptance by the whole group of speakers of that particular dialect.

Types of jargon

We can establish two large groups of jargon, although there are also smaller or more recent jargon groups that are not yet settled. Which are?

1-Social

As the name implies, social jargon are those that are created as an identity to differentiate from other people or social groups. For example, young people have their own defined jargon. They use a code that only those who belong to that social group can understand. It is necessary to point out, in the case of young people, that the jargon will vary depending on the locality and even the neighborhood. It should be noted that in this area, the definition of jargon can be confused with slang. Jargon and its Types with examples in detail

2-Professional

People who belong to a certain work environment can develop a specific type of language for their profession. This language is only shared by the team that belongs to said work environment.

In this case there is no interest in hiding the meaning of the words, as it happens in other types of jargon, but a specific term for a specific action or instrument is needed. That is precisely why it is not usually easy to follow a conversation between two professionals in a sector.

Example: Dyspnea is a term used by medical professionals. For us, dyspnea has no meaning, but for them it is the “feeling of shortness of breath that causes respiratory distress.” This is called medical jargon.

3-Regional

Although it is often referred to as a dialect , there are some variations of the language in the same dialect. For example, in the same city, in different neighborhoods, they can use different words to understand each other and that others cannot follow the conversation. Jargon and its Types with examples in detail

4-Technological

Due to the evolution of technology, today there is technological jargon, that is, the language used in SMS, WhatsApp messages or social networks. A clear example is the “xD” that younger people use to simulate a laugh.

Examples of professional and social jargons

Here are some examples of social jargon :

  • Largemouth: gossipy.
  • Babe: hooligan.
  • Mule: person who transports drugs from one place to another.
  • Roll: boring.
  • Muscle: muscular.
  • Padfoot: joint.
  • Sing: betray.
  • Cate: suspense.
  • Camel: person who sells drugs.
  • Apechugar: facing a problem.
  • Snitch: person who gives information about criminals.
  • No brainer: easy.
  • Toned: tipsy.
  • Journal: people who never pay.
  • Chump: silly.
  • Fetus: physically unattractive person.

Professional-type jargon

  • “It is an NN”: in the police field, an NN is a person who does not have any type of document. It is a person who is not identified.
  • Amputation: cutting off a part of the body.
  • Scaffold: temporary structure used to gain access to higher places. It is used in construction jargon.
  • Climb: refers to a person who wants to move up quickly in his job.
  • “The left turtle is not doing well”: ambulance lights.
  • Fuselage: frame or external part of the aircraft.
  • Didactics: a teacher’s way of teaching. Jargon and its Types with examples in detail
  • ADHD: disorder that presents a certain alteration or hyperactivity in behavior.

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