Language and Linguistics

Vocal cords and its detailed description

Vocal cords or vocal folds and its detailed description

 

Vocal cords

While discussing the Vocal cords and its detailed description, we analyse That the  vocal cords are the part of the sounding device directly responsible for the production The vocal cords are the part of the sounding device directly responsible for the production of the voice. They have no string shape, but rather a series of folds or membranous lips. In fact, its correct denomination stopped being vocal cords, since they are not stringing, and it happened to be vocal folds. If we consider only one side of the larynx, the vocal cord is formed thanks to the presence of a ligament called the inferior ligament or inferior thyroarytenoid.

Location

It is located inside the larynx, in the upper part of the trachea, which are subsequently attached to the arytenoid cartilages and prior to the thyroid cartilage. Its outer edges (as shown in the illustration) join the muscles of the larynx, while its inner edges are free (the hole). They are constructed from epithelium, but have a few muscle fibers in them, that is, the vocal muscle that tenses the anterior part of the ligament near the thyroid cartilage.

Structure and Characteristics

Structure and parts

If we consider only one side of the larynx, the vocal fold is formed thanks to the presence of a ligament called the inferior ligament or thyroarytenoid. This ligament runs from the ventral face of the arytenoid cartilage to the dorsal face of the thyroid cartilage and, on it, the vocal muscle and the laryngeal mucosa falls like a blanket, finally constituting the membranous folds of the vocal folds. Among the lower vocal folds is an opening that is called glottis. This glottis is divided in turn into a foraging glottis (space that remains between the ligament edges of the vocal folds and which is more anterior) and respiratory glottis (space that remains between the membranous edges, which does not close in phonation, and constitutes a channel through which air passes continuously. It is more later).

Anatomical features

They are triangular flat bands and pearly white. Above both sides of the vocal cords (the hole and the ligament itself) are the vestibular folds or false vocal cords that have a small sac between the two folds (not shown).

Organization and types of vocal folds

Location and types of vocal folds

There are 4 vocal folds:

2 uppers (ventricular bands), which do not participate in the articulation of the voice. [Dysfunctional]

2 lowers, the true vocal cords, responsible for the production of the voice. [Functional]

Characteristics of vocal folds

The two lower folds are two small elastic muscles, clinically termed vocal muscle (s):

If they open and collect at the sides, the air passes freely, without pressure: we breathe.

If, on the contrary, they get together, the air crashes against them, producing the sound we call voice.

Size of the vocal cords according to sex in people

The size of the vocal cords varies with sex, height, the amount of body mass and the age of people. In the adult man, the length of these ranges between 17.5 mm and 25 mm and in the adult woman, they range between 12 and 17.5 mm in length. This helps to differentiate the tone of the voice: While in men their voice is thicker and more severe, in women it is thinner, sharper and softer. In children the tone of voice is usually more acute, but with age, in male children their voice thickens.

Functions

Among the functions of the vocal cords are:

Voice production

There are 3 basic mechanisms of voice production:

Vibration of the folds, which produces the tonal or sound sounds (vocal, semivocal, nasal, etc.).

Interruption (total or partial) in the flow of air that leaves the lungs, which gives rise to the “deaf” sounds (deaf fricatives, deaf occlusives, etc.)

Combination of vibration and interruption, such as sound occlusives (in Spanish ‘b’, ‘d’ and ‘g’).

Breath Execution

It must always be run through the nose, otherwise, the air is not filtered to prevent contaminants such as dust from reaching the throat, vocal cords, larynx and finally to the lungs. It is recommended that when breathing after agitation, air is taken through the nose in four times and exhaled through the mouth in eight times, this has proven to be an effective method to reduce agitation, fatigue and vessel.

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